Need help identifying and restoring my first saws

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Au_craftsman
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Need help identifying and restoring my first saws

Post by Au_craftsman » June 27th, 2020, 4:00 pm

Hey everyone cheers for the help in advance, I was at a garage sale yesterday and came across 3 large saws. Image

The sizes from top to bottom are 1.8m, 1.3m, and 0.9m
The bottom one has what I assume are called M teeth and says "disston" on the handle.

Since the top saw has no hole at the end I have been told it's a dragsaw? Any suggestions on how I would go about getting it working again?

What's the best way to go about sharpening these? Do you think with a bit of work I could end up with a good usable saw?

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Jim_Thode
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Re: Need help identifying and restoring my first saws

Post by Jim_Thode » June 28th, 2020, 6:57 am

You are correct the saw on the left is a drag saw blade. You would need an engine powered drag saw to use it as designed. As: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XtxBUqJ3Xw

The center saw looks like it may be worn out and may not be worth the effort to put to use. The M tooth maybe could be restored to a serviceable user saw.

There are several methods to clean the rust off. I normally use water and a pumice stone ( https://pbase.com/jimthode/image/161465874 ) . It will remove the rust and will not damage the saw. For a badly pitted saw I have used a wire wheel to get most of the rust off. The M tooth is a little easier to sharpen then a peg an raker saw, just joint and file to match the existing tooth shape.

Au_craftsman
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JoinedCOLON June 27th, 2020, 1:36 am

Re: Need help identifying and restoring my first saws

Post by Au_craftsman » June 29th, 2020, 12:31 am

Jim_Thode wroteCOLON
June 28th, 2020, 6:57 am
You are correct the saw on the left is a drag saw blade. You would need an engine powered drag saw to use it as designed. As: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XtxBUqJ3Xw

The center saw looks like it may be worn out and may not be worth the effort to put to use. The M tooth maybe could be restored to a serviceable user saw.

There are several methods to clean the rust off. I normally use water and a pumice stone ( https://pbase.com/jimthode/image/161465874 ) . It will remove the rust and will not damage the saw. For a badly pitted saw I have used a wire wheel to get most of the rust off. The M tooth is a little easier to sharpen then a peg an raker saw, just joint and file to match the existing tooth shape.
Thanks very much mate what are the advantages/disadvantages of a m tooth saw compared to the peg and raker?

Thanks again big fan of your YouTube channel too

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Jim_Thode
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Re: Need help identifying and restoring my first saws

Post by Jim_Thode » June 29th, 2020, 7:03 am

In a nutshell I believe that the advantage of a vintage M tooth is that they are easier to sharpen. The disadvantage is that they may not cut quite as fast as a peg and raker. Modern M tooth saws are a different story, https://www.fs.fed.us/t-d/pubs/htmlpubs ... /index.htm

From the Crosscut Saw Manual, https://web.archive.org/web/20100530102 ... 2508hi.pdf
The two-person crosscut saw was evidently known by the Romans though little used by them. It wasn’t until the middle of the 15th century that the crosscut saw came into fairly common use in Europe. Records exist of the crosscut being used for cutting logs in the United States between 1635and 1681. About 1880, Pennsylvania lumbermen began felling trees with the crosscut. Before that time, all trees had been ax-felled and crosscut into lengths.Until the 15th century, the two-person crosscut saw used a plain tooth pattern. The M tooth pattern seems to have been developed and used in south Germany in the 1400s. Even as late as 1900 most of the European crosscuts still used the plain tooth pattern with a few exceptions of M tooth being used.Not until fairly recently was the saw with a raker or “drag”developed.In the case of plain, M, and Great American tooth patterns,each tooth both cuts the wood and clears out the shavings.However, in the case of the champion, lance, and perforated-lance tooth, cutter teeth cut the wood fibers and the rakers remove the scored wood from the cut.By the time crosscut use was at its peak, a large number of tooth patterns had been developed, each presumably suited to a particular set of conditions.

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