DIY rip saw #3

Here by popular demand, a forum dedicated to rip saws. We're definitely going against the grain with this one!
Gavin Longrain
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DIY rip saw #3

Post by Gavin Longrain » May 14th, 2020, 2:29 pm

cross cut peg tooth saw before conversion.jpg
before
pitsaw ready for ripping.jpg
after
pitsaw and chainsaw files.jpg
the files I used
pitsaw and chainsaw files.jpg (96.65 KiB) Viewed 1429 times
For the full story, click here:

https://www.shedtherapy.com/crosscut-sa ... -3-to-rip/

Trailsawyer
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Re: DIY rip saw #3

Post by Trailsawyer » May 14th, 2020, 8:04 pm

Gavin, thanks for posting rip saw #3, an interesting project!
I've never had the urge - or opportunity - to use a rip saw, but it's nice to see that your DIY conversion works!
Gary

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sumnergeo
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Re: DIY rip saw #3

Post by sumnergeo » May 15th, 2020, 5:52 am

I looked at your video and am not sure what you mean by straight teeth. I have been "ripping" a number of pecan logs and my procedure is to cut an inch or so into the butt with a 3-ft crosscut then split with wedges then draw knife and plane to get planks.

This is not pit saw sort of work since the logs are short and eight to ten inches in diameter. I've tried using my woodworker rip saw and it may do a better job than the lumbering crosssut for getting my notch started but I would like something a bit more agressive and be able to saw the length of a three to four foot log.

Gavin Longrain
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Re: DIY rip saw #3

Post by Gavin Longrain » May 26th, 2020, 3:30 am

By straight teeth I meant - and apologise I was not clear - that the tooth line is straight. This has a curved tooth line which I now know is less effective at ripping than a straight one.

Gavin Longrain
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Re: DIY rip saw #3

Post by Gavin Longrain » May 26th, 2020, 4:13 am

Sumnergeo writes:

I have been "ripping" a number of pecan logs and my procedure is to cut an inch or so into the butt with a 3-ft crosscut then split with wedges then draw knife and plane to get planks.

He could also try a froe and cleaving brake. That allows a degree of control as to where the split runs - indeed it was the Vikings' method of creating ship-planks. You need the right timber - I have no idea how well pecan cleaves. Curtis Buchanan has a lot of useful videos on youtube. e.g. https://youtu.be/JJw4KzJoi0I?t=392

I would like something a bit more agressive and be able to saw the length of a three to four foot log.

Well - if you care to re-file a piece of steel e.g.an old saw or bandsaw scrap you can find out. I have spent some happy hours with squared paper and pencil and protractor and compass drawing likely-looking ripping profiles. The minimum pitch I reckon is 22 mm because that allows an 8 mm Ø chainsaw file enough room to shape a gullet. Depending on your angles it leaves a tooth length of 10 to 15 mm. And 22 mm is a common pitch on bandsaw blades - I use them as a guide rather than measuring increments of 22 mm. For the short lengths that interest me a smaller pitch e.g. 22 mm is much better. Keeping the blade under tension may be a challenge - you could make a frame saw or you can use a thicker piece of steel. Mine are min 16 gauge

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