Next project

A forum about crosscut saw filing
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Crosscut Sawyer
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Next project

Post by Crosscut Sawyer » March 1st, 2011, 4:56 pm

I have this saw that has a really nice weight and length to it, but it's been filed down to the nubs before I ever got it. This weekend, I started on what I expect to be a pretty long term project (everything is with me) of filing down the gullets and spaces between the teeth, and attempting to rejuvenate this saw. It's a 5'3" symmetrical lance tooth with a nearly straight back, and only one handle hole per side. Kind of fits in the oddball category, but I would love to carry it in the woods.
5'3 001.JPG
5'3", nice weight and size to it
5'3 002.JPG
What I am starting with
5'3 003.JPG
See where the last filer hit the gullets with the corner of his file?
I jointed the saw and got a matching arc ~1" below the cutting edge, where the jointer rubbed the saw. This gave me a good reference point to hog out the metal. I am using a 7/32 chainsaw file between the teeth, and a burly 10" round file for the gullets.
5'3 009.JPG
One set of cutters and a raker done, might come back to them once I've done more and round that gullet out more
So here is what I've got so far. Might be a while until it is complete, or even ready for filing, but it's a good project to work on here and there.

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trailcrew
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Re: Next project

Post by trailcrew » March 2nd, 2011, 1:22 pm

Did you get to cut with that worn down Disston that Dolly had sharpened the nubs on? That thing cut like a dream. I'd wait on filing those gullets down until you can't get any more mileage out of the teeth. A shorter tooth will mean a stiffer tooth that'll track better in the cut. It would also be interesting to see how it cuts without deep gullets and then deepen them and see what kind of difference it makes.
Josh

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PATCsawyer
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recutting teeth

Post by PATCsawyer » March 2nd, 2011, 2:25 pm

I did the same thing this winter on an old but clean Simonds felling saw. Jointed it first, than spent hours with a chainsaw file. Dolly suggested I take the next one to a machinist, as they could cut faster and cleaner than the hand file method. Pic was a project in work.
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Simonds feller.jpg

Buggy Whip
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Re: Next project

Post by Buggy Whip » April 27th, 2011, 6:06 pm

I have huge interest in these projects. I have a 5 foot Homesteader thats a bit short in the tooth.
If it gets worn and filed flat it will still have alot of metal for a new set of teeth.
Nice to see good saws getting filed to work instead of painted.

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PATCsawyer
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Re: Next project

Post by PATCsawyer » April 28th, 2011, 3:33 pm

Here's the finished saw. I didn't take the teeth or gullets down to original depth, as I seldom cut logs greater than 30" diameter.
P1012925-1.JPG

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sumnergeo
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Re: Next project

Post by sumnergeo » May 2nd, 2011, 12:55 pm

I'm not sure this is right but it is something I've wondered about -

The spacing between rakers and total length along the sides and bottom of the gullet should be about the same. This allows a noodle to be that long: four-inch raker spacing with 1 3/4-inch sides on a gullet allow a long noodle (typical lance-tooth); two-inch raker spacing with 1-inch side on a gullet gives 2-inch noodle (two-man tuttle tooth); and 1 1/2-inch raker spacing with 3/4 inch deep gullet (D-handle tuttle tooth). Having a shallow gullet could mean some clogging but I suspect it only means the noodles get broken and won't be as long

Short teeth means stubby teeth and they might be harder to set. By deepening the space between the teeth, the sharpened end of the tooth can be back to its original width and hence easier to set.

I'm facing this with a 5-ft Simond No.13 (the 13 is a guess) - tuttle tooth bucking saw. I'm planning to deepen around the teeth so I can properly set them but plan to leave the gullets alone.

What do you think?
Last edited by 1 on sumnergeo, edited 0 times in total.

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sumnergeo
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Re: Next project

Post by sumnergeo » May 2nd, 2011, 12:57 pm

What exactly does one tell a machinist and what sort of tool do they use? Does it heat the saw?

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PATCsawyer
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Re: Next project

Post by PATCsawyer » May 2nd, 2011, 1:25 pm

Show the machinist a picture of a good saw, tell him exactly how far you want the teeth lowered (so your saw does not resemble a comb when finished) and that the teeth are on a circle (otherwise he might cut them all perpendicular to the back of the saw*. He will likely use a cutter blade of some type that will be oil washed throughout the process to prevent overheating and prolong the life of his cutter. A good machinist would have a variety of cutters and probably has a size to exactly fit the tooth gap and the gullets.

*If you drew a line down the center of each tooth they would all converge at one point like spokes on a bike. This is a good concept to keep in mind if you decide to file it by hand.

Starling_Saw
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Re: Next project

Post by Starling_Saw » May 3rd, 2011, 7:23 pm

I've started to work on an old saw this week. It has been filed very short in the teeth and the gullets of the cutter teeth has been filed with a square edged file. It even had some small cracks starting in the corners. I marked out the approximate depth of gullets with a black marker and roughed in the depth of gullets close to where I want them with my Post Grinder. I will then finish the gullets with a file. The grinding wheel I use, is a Norton 1/8" cutting wheel about a 36 grit. I'll also deepen the gullets of the Rakers as well, for this I will use a 1/2" wheel of the same grit. The coarse grit will cut the steel without generating a lot of heat. If you linger to long with the wheel on the steel it will turn blue from the heat. This will harden the steel so hard that a file will not cut the steel and it will cause the steel to crack. You also have to clean the wheel with a star dresser often to keep the wheel from loading up with steel and to create new fractured abrasive particles on wheel. Most of the industrial saw shops have Post grinders to sharpen circle saws and slash gang saws. If you need help finding a saw shop send me a message and I'll help you find a shop.When I complete this saw next week I'll post a picture.
Attachments
DSC05390.JPG
Disston one man 48"
DSC05388.JPG
Disston logo and teeth
DSC05392.JPG
Grinding Cutter gullets with Acme Post grinder

Starling_Saw
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Re: Next project

Post by Starling_Saw » May 5th, 2011, 5:03 pm

I finished my project saw today. I feel it turned out pretty good. Not perfect but defently better looking and it will cut wood. I put the Raker cleance at .014 and the cutters at .015 as it will be used on green Alpine Fir.
Attachments
DSC05394.JPG
Project saw with longer teeth and tuned up.

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