The Pitted Saw

A forum about crosscut saw filing
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Jim_Thode
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The Pitted Saw

Post by Jim_Thode » March 14th, 2017, 8:24 am

Will it cut again?

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A work in progress..........

Jim

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PATCsawyer
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by PATCsawyer » March 14th, 2017, 11:55 am

I see some real steel on the one tooth you have prepped. Probably some life remaining in those old bones.

dayle1960
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by dayle1960 » March 14th, 2017, 1:25 pm

The closer to the tips the more pitting. Seems to me that you will have to nearly break off the teeth and rakers down to the gullets and then file new teeth, rakers and gullets. I foresee a hard time coming your way in order to make this saw a useable one again. If it were me, I'd file one raker and one tooth just to see how extensive the pitting is on a filed edge. My guess is the pits will make a fine sharp edge almost impossible.

But, by all means make be choke on my words and I will give you high praise if you can rehab this saw and make it useable again without having to take too much length off the teeth. I hope I am wrong, but the pitting is just too deep.

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Jim_Thode
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by Jim_Thode » March 14th, 2017, 9:06 pm

Ok, I got it sharp. When the weather breaks and I find a live or rubber man saw partner I'll give it a try. Maybe I'll take it to the BCHW Rendezvous this weekend. I do have a specific job in mind for a junker saw and I'll report more on that if it works out.

It is a 7' falling saw, most likely a Royal Chinook based on the thickness and taper.

Image

More photos and a little bit of the work around for the pitted surface at:
http://www.pbase.com/jimthode/pitted_saw

Jim

dayle1960
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by dayle1960 » March 15th, 2017, 5:33 am

Jim, it may be my eyes but it appears the cutter edges are ragged and not knife edged sharp. Also I worry about the depth of the pitting. I don't know how much stress is exerted on a tooth per stroke when cutting, but if it is a lot the some of the deeply pitted cutters might snap due to those stresses.

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Jim_Thode
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by Jim_Thode » March 15th, 2017, 11:01 am

dayle1960 wroteCOLONJim, it may be my eyes but it appears the cutter edges are ragged and not knife edged sharp. Also I worry about the depth of the pitting. I don't know how much stress is exerted on a tooth per stroke when cutting, but if it is a lot the some of the deeply pitted cutters might snap due to those stresses.
You're correct, most of the cutter edges are ragged. However it is only about the 1/8" on the very tip that ever see any action and for the most part that tips are clean and sharp. The pitting has reduced the strength of the teeth but there are two things working in this saws favor. One is that the saw started at 0.103" thick and that gives some extra strength compared to thinner saws. The other thing in this saw favor is that the teeth are relatively short, about 1" mid-span. This short length greatly reduces the bending stress on the teeth compared to a full length tooth. On this saw if they do fail I believe that they would bend rather then snap off because it is not an overly hard or brittle saw.

Time will tell how it works out. The real test is how it preforms in wood. I originally was thinking I'd use it on some soft green alder but I may have an option to try it on some harder douglas fir. In either case I'll try to stay away from knots. Knotts can damage even the best saws.

Jim

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Jim_Thode
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by Jim_Thode » March 16th, 2017, 6:45 pm

To answer the original questions, yes it will cut.

Single bucking is a little awkward with a 7' falling saw but with a little rigging (to act as a saw partner) it did cut. It ran smooth with no dragging and cut down through the small alder very well.

Jim

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dayle1960
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by dayle1960 » March 17th, 2017, 2:32 am

Jim, you are becoming a legend to me.

PackStringSaw
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by PackStringSaw » March 18th, 2017, 3:10 am

Nice, Jim. Thinking about all the saws out there like this, I was curious what you'll do with the saw now in terms of additional re-hab work, if any. Are the pits so deep that you won't try to take the metal down any more, just oil it up and call it good? Do you think there's any future in people using these pitted saws for regular work? Maybe dumb questions, but I'm thinking about all the once-good saws we see out there like this one.
John

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brianthehurdler
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Re: The Pitted Saw

Post by brianthehurdler » March 18th, 2017, 10:32 pm

Apart from having to dress/polish the outside edge of the cutting teeth every time that the saw is filed, presumably, the only long-term issue with a saw like this will be that there will be a little more friction between the saw and the side of the kerf because of the pits?
Or will this actually not be noticeable after the surface has been polished up a bit?
Brian.

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