Log Holder

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Re: Log Holder

Postby SalmonCreek » October 25th, 2012, 8:39 am

My wife already thinks I'm nuts.......... but good idea Jim!
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Re: Log Holder

Postby trolleypup » January 27th, 2013, 11:34 pm

I keep saying I need to make a sawbuck...and obtain a couple good test logs.

Sawhorse just takes time, but finding test logs in San Francisco is a real trick. Then we have a nice windy storm so now there are logs here and there...but before I can haul in the candidates, I have to clear out some other logs that found their way into the garage...cut them up and haul them to the back.

And still no sawbuck. Oops. But someone has abandoned a pallet down the street, and I have some pitiful rachet straps. I'll note the verisimilitude of sawing close to the ground just like on the trails.

Fine grained like-green hardwood:
Image
(yes, diesel in the stainless olive oil sprayer)

Moist dead soft pine:
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I think I got asked three times why I wasn't using a power tool. :rolleyes:

A mixed pile of the resulting shavings:
Image
The pretty pink ones are plum, the grey is the pine, white and yellow are other hardwoods. Got some 5" noodles out of the plum!

I have now retrieved the test logs...and the big log...well, I couldn't lift it onto a sawbuck to save my life...so there is going to be more low sawing.
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Re: Log Holder

Postby Double Ott » January 28th, 2013, 7:21 am

Sweet pile of noodles. Looks like your saw works well in soft, green and hardwood. What saw, maker, were you using?

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Re: Log Holder

Postby trolleypup » January 28th, 2013, 4:49 pm

Double Ott wrote:Sweet pile of noodles. Looks like your saw works well in soft, green and hardwood. What saw, maker, were you using?

That is a 3 foot Disston 554 (mid coarse champion) freshly sharpened by Dolly. I was pretty amazed by the number and size of actual noodles coming out of the pine! The plum was pretty smooth for such hard wood...but I could tell just by the feel that it was cutting beautifully.

All cutting done in the curve of the saw and I was trying to keep the speed through the kerf *as well as* the downward pressure at the area of cutter contact as even as possible. Keeping the pressure even is tricky, since it means continually varying the forces on the handles though both the forward and back stroke (extra "bonus" for me is that my power stroke is usually the push stroke).

The pine was up against the size limit on that saw...not because I couldn't clear the chips, but the gullets were filling up in a single pass when I was working efficiently.
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Re: Log Holder

Postby Double Ott » January 29th, 2013, 10:49 am

Thank you for your reply. I have a similar saw... Disston Keystone K 954 Champion. It is a flat ground blade with a champion (tuttle) tooth design, 3.5 long, overall 4 ft., wt. 5 lb. 2 oz.

It's currently being sharpened by TreeLine for me. I though that yours looked familiar. I should be getting my saws back from him in a week or so. He also has a Henry Disston & Sons Perforated No. 514 Spring Steel. It is a flat ground blade with a perforated lance tooth design, 3.5' long, overall 4 ft., wt. 4 lbs. 12 oz. saw that he is working on for me.

I'm hoping that I'll be all set for soft and hardwoods with these two. I would be thrilled if I can get noodles as nice and clean looking as yours are.

Regards, tom
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Re: Log Holder

Postby trolleypup » January 29th, 2013, 5:03 pm

Double Ott wrote:Thank you for your reply. I have a similar saw... Disston Keystone K 954 Champion. It is a flat ground blade with a champion (tuttle) tooth design, 3.5 long, overall 4 ft., wt. 5 lb. 2 oz.

It's currently being sharpened by TreeLine for me. I though that yours looked familiar. I should be getting my saws back from him in a week or so. He also has a Henry Disston & Sons Perforated No. 514 Spring Steel. It is a flat ground blade with a perforated lance tooth design, 3.5' long, overall 4 ft., wt. 4 lbs. 12 oz. saw that he is working on for me.

I'm hoping that I'll be all set for soft and hardwoods with these two. I would be thrilled if I can get noodles as nice and clean looking as yours are.

Regards, tom

Someone else asked offline what the raker depth was...it is a scant .008.

Yeah, a Keystone 954 is pretty much identical to the 554. My saw is not quite flat ground, 15/16 gauge.

The 514 has the same shape, just the different tooth pattern...check...it likely has the one gauge taper so many one man saws have.

514s are really nice working saws...I've heard nice things from people who've gotten my saws via Dolly's sharpening. All the saws with that plate style are easy working saws, pretty stiff and forgiving for beginners. The heavily tapered thin swayback saws from Disston work a bit easier if your technique is good, but will buckle and jam if you don't drive them right. The trade is the thinner tapered saws are quite a bit lighter.

Hope to hear how they work when they get back. Green maple or sycamore are sweet cutting woods if you don't have green fruit tree woods available.
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Re: Log Holder

Postby ChiricahuaZac » January 30th, 2013, 6:21 am

Ahh, that’s a beautiful picture of noodles! Worthy of a frame, or a least a screen saver.

nice job trolleypup! do you cut all your firewood by hand? that will keep you warm in the winter ;)
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Re: Log Holder

Postby trolleypup » January 30th, 2013, 3:36 pm

ChiricahuaZac wrote:Ahh, that’s a beautiful picture of noodles! Worthy of a frame, or a least a screen saver.

nice job trolleypup! do you cut all your firewood by hand? that will keep you warm in the winter ;)

Kind of you to say so, but I should have taken the picture when it was all long pink plum noodles, not after I stepped on the longest ones and kicked the pile about and mixed in the chips and dust from the other layers of wood cutting.

But if you want a higher resolution image I'd be happy to send that along.

Actually I don't have a working fireplace...but I figure if I cut the logs in little pieces and dry and split them, I can put the resulting firewood on Craigslist and someone will come and take it away. I did my share of cutting and splitting firewood as a kid...we heated the house and a big greenhouse with wood (mostly loblolly pine). Axe, bow saw and chainsaw, and then wood maul and wheelbarrow.
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Re: Log Holder

Postby Cheech » February 1st, 2013, 2:32 pm

In a pinch I have used lumber as light as 1x4 for the cradles (X's), with three 2x4s for the horizontals. The trick is to stake and cross screw the four feet.
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Re: Log Holder

Postby Treeline » February 2nd, 2013, 7:16 am

trolleypup wrote:Someone else asked offline what the raker depth was...it is a scant .008.

Yeah, a Keystone 954 is pretty much identical to the 554. My saw is not quite flat ground, 15/16 gauge.

The 514 has the same shape, just the different tooth pattern...check...it likely has the one gauge taper so many one man saws have.

514s are really nice working saws...I've heard nice things from people who've gotten my saws via Dolly's sharpening. All the saws with that plate style are easy working saws, pretty stiff and forgiving for beginners. The heavily tapered thin swayback saws from Disston work a bit easier if your technique is good, but will buckle and jam if you don't drive them right. The trade is the thinner tapered saws are quite a bit lighter.

Hope to hear how they work when they get back. Green maple or sycamore are sweet cutting woods if you don't have green fruit tree woods available.


Wow, .008 is hardly enough to swage, but maybe I'll give it a shot for Tom's hardwood saw. Could you post a detail pic of the teeth and rakers on your saw. curious to see how much swage it has and the angles on the teeth.

Thanks for posting the pics.
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