Welding broken teeth?

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Welding broken teeth?

Postby Gavin Longrain » May 22nd, 2017, 11:09 am

I know nothing about welding but I want to learn how to weld broken teeth. My neighbour does know about welding. He said Do you use TIG or MIG?
I don't, so ask my friends here: What do I use?
I happen to have a welder with a wire spool that feeds into the weld. Is that good enough?

I know bandsaws were brazed together. Would brazing work to re-attach broken teeth? And if this did work, is welding better anyway?
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Re: Welding broken teeth?

Postby Jim_Thode » May 22nd, 2017, 12:16 pm

I use a MIG welder but a TIG, flux cored wire feed or even stick welder should work. I have gas, MIG and stick welders but prefer the MIG welder for saws and lighter weight material. It is clean and fast.

MIG welders normally have a roll of wire in the welder that feed to the weld. You could also use a wire feed welder (like a MIG) without the shielding gas if you use flux cored wire.

Yes, you should be able to brass braze or silver braze a tooth on. You would likely need to scarf the joint for silver alloy brazing. Brazing would not be as strong and likely take more time then welding.

Some pics of welding at:
http://www.bchw.org/Tech%20tips/sharpen ... ioning.htm
And:
http://www.pbase.com/jimthode/tooth_weld


For a non-welding solution you can just use a file to make a locking dovetail type joint:
Image

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Re: Welding broken teeth?

Postby brianthehurdler » May 23rd, 2017, 10:07 pm

What kind of power range would you look for in a welder for saw-blades?

I'm looking to do some welding (of billhook tangs in my case), so if I do buy a welder I'd like it to be able to cope with welding saw teeth as well. I imagine that saw teeth would require about as low an output as you can get? I don't expect billhook tangs would need a whole lot more, so the two jobs could, I hope, be covered by the one, low-output, welder.

Brian.

PS. Loved the dovetailed tooth!
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Re: Welding broken teeth?

Postby PATCsawyer » May 24th, 2017, 2:41 am

I started with zero knowledge of welding, purchased a entry-level MIG welder, and had very good luck fixing teeth and rakers right out of the box. Not difficult to do. I am a convert to potatoes but probably could've used peanut butter, bananas, or anything to cover the near teeth from the unshielded splatter. My previous exploits here:
viewtopic.php?f=21&t=1264&p=6540&hilit=welding#p6537
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Re: Welding broken teeth?

Postby Jim_Thode » May 24th, 2017, 7:22 am

brianthehurdler wrote:What kind of power range would you look for in a welder for saw-blades?

I'm looking to do some welding (of billhook tangs in my case), so if I do buy a welder I'd like it to be able to cope with welding saw teeth as well. I imagine that saw teeth would require about as low an output as you can get? I don't expect billhook tangs would need a whole lot more, so the two jobs could, I hope, be covered by the one, low-output, welder.

Brian.

PS. Loved the dovetailed tooth!



Brian,
I use a 135 amp, 120V 20A powered wire feed MIG for saws. I've also used it on steel up to 1/4" thick welding from both sides with good results. I would think it would work on billhook tangs at the highest setting.
Mine is set up with 0.025" solid core wire and I use C25 (75% Argon/25% CO2) shielding gas. For thick saws I use a medium high setting (welding from both sides)and that would have to be reduced for thinner saws.

Jim

P5240413a.jpg
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Re: Welding broken teeth?

Postby Starling_Saw » May 29th, 2017, 6:19 pm

I've used the Lincoln 100 for a long time and have just upgraded to the 145. They both run on 110volts and I also use the (Mixed Gases) 75% Argon/25% CO2. for the shielding gas. which gives a good clean weld. I posted a bit on replacing teeth awhile back on this site. Located Here: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=455#p1134 With a little bit of practice you will be able to save these old saws from the "art saw" pile and get many more years of use out of them.
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