length

Here by popular demand, a forum dedicated to rip saws. We're definitely going against the grain with this one!
8yearplan
PostsCOLON 13
JoinedCOLON August 11th, 2014, 7:01 pm

length

Post by 8yearplan » September 12th, 2014, 9:35 pm

If you had just one ripsaw what would be the optimal length?

User avatar
brianthehurdler
PostsCOLON 97
JoinedCOLON November 16th, 2012, 11:24 am
LocationCOLON Gloucestershire, UK.
CONTACTCOLON

Re: length

Post by brianthehurdler » September 13th, 2014, 12:55 am

The length that's right for the log you're about to saw!

You need to give us more information if we're to make a vaguely intelligent stab at answering a question like this:

whereabouts are you? They grow different sized trees on different sizes of the atlantic.

what are you proposing to do with your pitsaw? If you're going to build your own house by hand and plank by plank you'll know what sized logs you'll be needing to cut. If you just want to try a pitsaw out and see what they're like, chances are you'll aim to cut something around 18" in diameter (or less). If you're planning to demonstrate regularly at a museum or somesuch, you may be hoping to convert some pretty big timber.

If all of the above (and more) then one saw won't be enough.

The chances are that (like me) you fancy an occasional go. If so, Then logs between 12" and 18" diameter are plenty big enough to handle and a six foot saw will do you fine (less teeth to sharpen, too).

In fact, a more useful question might be 'how big a log can I comfortably handle if I wanted to try a bit of pitsawing?.

Brian.

8yearplan
PostsCOLON 13
JoinedCOLON August 11th, 2014, 7:01 pm

Re: length

Post by 8yearplan » September 13th, 2014, 10:44 pm

I'm saving up to move into the wilderness up in Alaska, I want to build a log cabin exactly like Dick Proeneke in Alone In The Wilderness, I think he had a 28" ripsaw. I'll be alone.

User avatar
Jim_Thode
PostsCOLON 720
JoinedCOLON June 28th, 2012, 9:34 am
LocationCOLON Onalaska, Washington State, USA
CONTACTCOLON

Re: length

Post by Jim_Thode » September 14th, 2014, 8:56 pm

Looks like Dick Proenneke had a rip hand saw and not a rip pit saw. Just a small saw for small jobs.
rip saw.jpg
rip saw2.jpg
From:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BERbQwrtit4

This list of tools does not show a rip saw but the video above clearly shows one:
http://www.pinterest.com/simonsonbond_z ... ilderness/


Jim

User avatar
trailcrew
PostsCOLON 370
JoinedCOLON February 16th, 2011, 9:47 am
LocationCOLON Asheville, NC

Re: length

Post by trailcrew » September 15th, 2014, 2:28 am

I'd go with the longest Disston D-8 thumbhole rip you can find, 5 or 6 tpi. Then get a smaller panel saw filed rip, about 8-10 tpi for finer work. Once you have those you'll start breaking down some boards and realize that ripping lumber by hand is a heck of a lot of work. Dick was a small man, but take a look at those arms.
Josh

8yearplan
PostsCOLON 13
JoinedCOLON August 11th, 2014, 7:01 pm

Re: length

Post by 8yearplan » September 15th, 2014, 6:13 pm

Thanks guys.

User avatar
brianthehurdler
PostsCOLON 97
JoinedCOLON November 16th, 2012, 11:24 am
LocationCOLON Gloucestershire, UK.
CONTACTCOLON

Re: length

Post by brianthehurdler » September 15th, 2014, 8:54 pm

Another option would be one of the japanese-type pull ripsaws. I've no personal experience of them but there are plenty of afficionados around. You can rip quite large logs with some of them.

Brian.

Gavin Longrain
PostsCOLON 653
JoinedCOLON May 17th, 2012, 10:51 am
LocationCOLON Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland
CONTACTCOLON

Re: length

Post by Gavin Longrain » September 18th, 2014, 3:15 am

To rip, you want a japanese maebiki - if you can find one for reasonable money.
Image
The advantages of it are that you don't need a pit. You can work one-man only. You can rip horizontal or vertical. You can do see-saw sawing where the log only needs be lifted up a little - the illustration above is see-sawing
Disadvantage is to find one in good order - but you can get lucky.

What's wrong with a chainsaw mill?
PM me if you want details of someone in UK with wider knowledge of these saws than me - for I have yet to use one. Altho' I would like one.

Trustee
PostsCOLON 5
JoinedCOLON January 11th, 2015, 11:36 pm
LocationCOLON Oxfordshire
CONTACTCOLON

Re: length

Post by Trustee » January 13th, 2015, 12:54 am

A while back I posted on The Oxfordshire Woodland Group web forum about the use of the Japaenese Maebiki saw by Axel Weller and Jack Wheeler.

Clearly this is a low cost, high labour input effort, but can produce quality slabs in the woodland.

Trustee

Trustee
PostsCOLON 5
JoinedCOLON January 11th, 2015, 11:36 pm
LocationCOLON Oxfordshire
CONTACTCOLON

Re: length

Post by Trustee » January 13th, 2015, 1:01 am

I am currently preparing to undertake a living woodland archeology project using our woodland sawpit and medieval style frame saw that was made by Herbert L Russell modelled on a design by Henry Russell.

Trustee

BUTTON_POST_REPLY