Finally scores

Post here if you are trying to identify a saw, or want to discuss specific features of saws that can be used for identification.

Finally scores

Postby Akparker219 » August 1st, 2015, 12:16 am

Hello all, first off I want to say thank you for the add! I have been interested in crosscuts for a while now and finally found 3 on the ol Craigslist! One, I cleaned up and just have to learn to sharpen (and properly use) and it's good to go. The others need a little more tlc and I can't seem to figure out what the one man is. I "believe" the other two man is a Atkins no.379 hollow back Tuttle tooth? But I am not positive. I have not been able to find any etching on either. The one man did have the superior badge on the remaining handle though. Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks!
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Akparker219
 
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Re: Finally scores

Postby dayle1960 » August 2nd, 2015, 4:24 am

Looks like you got some nice saws. By the way your shop looks, you will have the necessary abilities to rehab the saws. Now you need to manufacture a saw stand so you can sharpen the teeth. Have you gotten files, spiders, jointers, or a long jointer?

Have a great day.
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Re: Finally scores

Postby beng » August 3rd, 2015, 3:09 am

I have a number of old hand saws, mostly one-man carpenter and rip saws, but I also have a half-dozen two-man crosscuts including one felling saw.

I have found it harder to find etches and other identification on the two-man saws than on the smaller hand-saws.

On a hand saw that has "Warranted Superior" on the medallion it means that the saw was made by a known company but as a low-end line or for sale by a retailer that may have wanted to sell it as their own brand. Warranted Superior marked saws with a Keystone symbol in the medallion design are supposed to be manufactured by Disston, ones with an eagle in the design could be any of a number of manufacturers, even a U.K. manufacturer.

It seems that as many or more saws were sold as "warranted superior" as there were brand-name saws, and those WS saws often had less or no etching on them. I just found a two-man bucking crosscut at a house-sale that looks to have never been used, it's blade is still mostly shiny, but it has no sign of an etch or stamping on it, so maybe it was a second or low-end blade made by a known manufacturer for sale by a general retailer or hardware store and no markings were ever put on it.

Of course you know that the "hollow back" saws are usually considered "felling" saws, made lighter than a bucking saw so they can cut down trees more effectively and easier. The wide saws with a straighter back are the "bucking" saws, made heavy so the weight of their blades on the few points contacting the log being cut lets them cut more quickly, and the extra width does not matter as much because it is not being used sideways adding to friction.

In the end I am happy just having a saw that has not been sharpened half to death and has no missing teeth. If I put a micrometer on it and find that it is a tapered blade then that is a bonus and means it is probably a pretty good quality blade. Without a maker's mark all you can do is try and match them up to drawings in catalogs and to photos of known saws and make a guess. It is fun and interesting to get input from others on internet forums, but nothing beats spending time looking at old literature and photos of known saws.
beng
 
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Re: Finally scores

Postby Akparker219 » August 3rd, 2015, 10:39 pm

dayle1960 wrote:Looks like you got some nice saws. By the way your shop looks, you will have the necessary abilities to rehab the saws. Now you need to manufacture a saw stand so you can sharpen the teeth. Have you gotten files, spiders, jointers, or a long jointer?

Have a great day.



Thank you! I am planning on making a stand here in a few weeks. I have not found any files, spiders, jointers, or a long jointer yet. Have been keeping an eye out though!
Akparker219
 
Posts: 5
Joined: July 29th, 2015, 10:44 am

Re: Finally scores

Postby Akparker219 » August 3rd, 2015, 10:48 pm

beng wrote:I have a number of old hand saws, mostly one-man carpenter and rip saws, but I also have a half-dozen two-man crosscuts including one felling saw.

I have found it harder to find etches and other identification on the two-man saws than on the smaller hand-saws.

On a hand saw that has "Warranted Superior" on the medallion it means that the saw was made by a known company but as a low-end line or for sale by a retailer that may have wanted to sell it as their own brand. Warranted Superior marked saws with a Keystone symbol in the medallion design are supposed to be manufactured by Disston, ones with an eagle in the design could be any of a number of manufacturers, even a U.K. manufacturer.

It seems that as many or more saws were sold as "warranted superior" as there were brand-name saws, and those WS saws often had less or no etching on them. I just found a two-man bucking crosscut at a house-sale that looks to have never been used, it's blade is still mostly shiny, but it has no sign of an etch or stamping on it, so maybe it was a second or low-end blade made by a known manufacturer for sale by a general retailer or hardware store and no markings were ever put on it.

Of course you know that the "hollow back" saws are usually considered "felling" saws, made lighter than a bucking saw so they can cut down trees more effectively and easier. The wide saws with a straighter back are the "bucking" saws, made heavy so the weight of their blades on the few points contacting the log being cut lets them cut more quickly, and the extra width does not matter as much because it is not being used sideways adding to friction.

In the end I am happy just having a saw that has not been sharpened half to death and has no missing teeth. If I put a micrometer on it and find that it is a tapered blade then that is a bonus and means it is probably a pretty good quality blade. Without a maker's mark all you can do is try and match them up to drawings in catalogs and to photos of known saws and make a guess. It is fun and interesting to get input from others on internet forums, but nothing beats spending time looking at old literature and photos of known saws.


Thanks for the info! I am just happy I found them and just want to get them back to working order and take em out in the woods where they belong and put them to work! As soon as I find a handle for the one man and sharpen it, should be ready to go! I love all old tools and love restoring them back to new. They sure don't make them like they use to. That's for sure
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Joined: July 29th, 2015, 10:44 am


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