372 Colonial Bucking saw

Post here if you are trying to identify a saw, or want to discuss specific features of saws that can be used for identification.

372 Colonial Bucking saw

Postby Jim_Thode » July 12th, 2015, 5:17 pm

I had never heard of a Colonial Bucking saw but it seems to be a nice quality saw. Here are the photos:
Z99A9070a2.jpg


Z99A9062a.jpg


Other then the logo the only other mark is this diamond:
Z99A9069a.jpg


Anyone heard of this brand? I found absolutely nothing online.
Jim
User avatar
Jim_Thode
 
Posts: 666
Joined: June 28th, 2012, 9:34 am
Location: Onalaska, Washington State, USA

Re: 372 Colonial Bucking saw

Postby Trailsawyer » July 12th, 2015, 7:09 pm

I have not heard of a Colonial saw, but I have a double bit axe that is embossed with the bell and "rings for quality" logo.
Colonial was, according to info in the Axe Makers of North America book, a house brand of Schwabacher's hardware in Seattle. It also mentions
Colonial Axe and Tool Company as a manufacturer.
It is a nice looking saw!
Gary
Trailsawyer
 
Posts: 80
Joined: July 1st, 2012, 7:27 am
Location: SW Washington State

Re: 372 Colonial Bucking saw

Postby Jim_Thode » July 12th, 2015, 9:05 pm

Gary,
Thanks for the info. That is where the 1869 date comes from. I found this:
"The three Schwabacher brothers’ only sister, Barbetta (Babette) Schwabacher (January 3, 1836 – January 7, 1908), married the brothers’ business associate Bailey Gatzert in 1861. The couple headed in 1869 for Seattle—then a town of barely 1,000 people—where Gatzert established a branch of Schwabacher Bros. & Company. Gatzert would go on to become Seattle’s first (and, as of 2009, only) Jewish mayor. Schwabacher Bros. & Company became Seattle’s first wholesaler, with a business opened October 11, 1869. Schwabachers’ 1872 Seattle shop at Front Street (now First Avenue South) and Yesler Way was the city’s first brick building. Under Gatzert’s direction, the company also constructed a warehouse, a grist mill, and Schwabacher’s Wharf. "
Seattle_Schwabacher_Hardware_1900.jpg


I also found a Colonial Steel Company that made tool steels but I don't know if they were related to the Colonial Axe and Tool Company.

Jim
User avatar
Jim_Thode
 
Posts: 666
Joined: June 28th, 2012, 9:34 am
Location: Onalaska, Washington State, USA


Return to Saw ID

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest