Tutorial: rotating saw vise - part 1

A forum about crosscut saw filing

Tutorial: rotating saw vise - part 1

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2012, 1:02 pm

Tutorial: Crosscut Saw Vise – with hearty thanks to Dolly Chapman whose design inspired this version.
1.1(Small).JPG


Dolly comments:
• It is easy to set up and break down and doesn’t take up too much space.
• It can be set up on uneven ground (outside) and adjusted higher or lower for different-height people.
• You can work on either side of the saw
• When you set the teeth, you rotate the jaws so the saw is horizontal . Hold the anvil under the tooth and swing the hammer straight down. It’s much easier to be accurate with a firm swing aimed straight down than sideways.

Here are various views of the vise to give you an idea of how it goes together:
disassembled full view.JPG
[
disassembled end.JPG


By slackening the end-nuts the jaws rotate on the horizontal axis:
Attachments
jaws lean away.jpg
jaws lean 10 oclock.JPG
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Tutorial: rotating saw vise - part 2

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2012, 1:17 pm

To make this vise:
1. Decide how long your jaws must be. That will be either the length of your longest saw plus 12”, or what storage or transport you have available. In my case it was the length of my van’s floor.
2. Check your jaws for wind or twist. Note the right hand jaw here has a crack and so may be rejected.
2.JPG
See if two straight-edges are parallel. Here the yellow and black edges are parallel.

3. The timber dries with a convex and concave side. Use this to grip the saw better and have the concave surface inside facing the saw. Make sure the grain aligns as shown.
4. Because the right hand jaw above does not press flat against the left hand jaw, I discarded it and got another. It is important the jaws will bite flat together. Note the knot on the top of the left-hand jaw. This made planing difficult later. Do select the most knot-free timber you can get.
5. Here is new jaw, with slightly different dimensions to left-hand jaw, but at least it lies flat against the left-hand jaw.
5.JPG

6. To keep track of which side is up, I like to mark arrows. This can save drilling holes where you don't want them. :?
6.JPG

7. Set a marking gauge at 2 ½” and scribe a line along the bottom. You will drill your eyebolt-holes on this line.
7.JPG
Attachments
3.JPG
Observe a 'D' pattern on left and 'C' pattern of growth rings on right.
Gavin Longrain
 
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Tutorial - rotating saw vise - part 3

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2012, 1:22 pm

8. I marked 5” in from each end. That length depends on your eyebolt’s length and how much eyebolt you want sticking out horizontally from your jaws.
8.JPG

9. Lay a saw whose curve you think is representative of your saw collection on the jaw.
9.JPG

10. By laying a flexible edge along the teeth, you can draw a smooth curve.
10.JPG

You could also draw an arc with a pencil fixed to a non-stretch string approx 30 feet long.
11. Using any convenient tool, cut the profile to the line.
11.JPG

12. Drill the eye-bolt holes on the marking gauge’s 2 ½” line. Once you have decided on your end-holes, the remaining holes are to be equidistant. I have seen images and plans of other vises with holes approx 24” apart. I chose to put mine approx 10” apart.
12.JPG
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Tutorial - rotating saw vise - part 4

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2012, 1:27 pm

13. Drill as horizontal as you can sighting along the scribed 2 ½” line in the middle of the jaws.
13.JPG

14. This will yield 2 channels.
14.JPG

15. Fit a jaw eyebolt as anchor and place your leg-support eyebolt in the groove you just drilled. Trace the profile of the eye with a pencil.
15.JPG

16. I mixed charcoal and grease to create a marking compound. (You could use marker pen or engineers blue.) I smear that on the eye and place the eye in the hollow. I then whittle the black, proud areas and repeat until the eye fits snugly.
16.JPG

17. Remove the wood from the eye with a curved knife, chisel, or any other handy tool.
17.JPG
Gavin Longrain
 
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Tutorial - rotating saw vise - part 5

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2012, 1:34 pm

18. I mark the jaws with a marking gauge to then shape with drawknife, plane or any other tool.
18.JPG

19. Round the jaws with with drawknife, spokeshave, plane, axe or whatever you need to create the filing angles you need. Here I point out a knot I wish I had not got - you really should only have knot-free timber. Knots make it much harder to plane. :roll:
P7264491.JPG
Rounded edges are shown along with scribe lines. The knot makes it tricky for me to create the profile I want. I will soon reach for an axe to hack away this knot.
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Re: Tutorial - rotating saw vise - part 5

Postby goodfeller » July 27th, 2012, 8:47 am

Thanks, Gavin, very useful.
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Re: Tutorial - rotating saw vise - part 5

Postby benjaminkansas » July 28th, 2012, 4:10 pm

Gavin,you built a fine vice.I like when you metioned you can level it on uneven ground.The eye bolts used to mont the legs is a sound design.also Im glad you got a jointer on your other post.Thanks for sharing.Brother Benjamin.
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Re: Tutorial: rotating saw vise - part 1

Postby Gavin Longrain » May 6th, 2017, 9:17 pm

Five years after I posted the above, here is latest version. I used recycled glued, laminated beams so the vise cheeks will not warp. I had them re-sawn on a mobile bandsaw mill so the cheek faces meet perfectly. To see this live, come visit me at ShedTherapy.com HQ anytime. Even better join a saw-sharpening course here. Better yet, join the course taught by Dolly here in Dalbeattie 28 & 29 May 2017. Look on Eventbrite for Dolly Chapman saw sharpening. I have now built half-a-dozen or so vises and I think this one is acceptable.
I won't post a tutorial on the latest version, but if you do make yourself a vise, this video may interest you. I recommend glued, laminated softwood 2"x2". A salvage yard may have big section glue-lam beams which you can get re-sawn at a mobile bandmill e.g. Woodmiser.
20170506_215928.jpg
Yes, the eyebolts should be same side as tool-tray.
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