German tuttle-tooth saw

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German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby PATCsawyer » December 10th, 2016, 6:43 am

I had a friend give me a 32" German tuttle-tooth saw for my opinion. He'd purchased it retail for 149.95 and was curious as to how I thought it cut straight out of the box. Hmmmm. First take, it felt flimsy. The 18 gauge flat plate wiggled like sheet metal and had a pronounced bow to one side. The teeth were supposedly "hand sharpened", but it looked more like they were hit quickly with a grinder. Heat discoloration on some of the teeth and rakers made for hard steel even though the base metal was soft. Settings varied widely, with the rakers so low that their depth was measurable with a ruler, and teeth set unevenly. The saw came with an auxiliary handle but was punched on only the toe for two person operation, not something you'd likely do with a saw this short. A test run through a dry oak log produced fine dust and not much headway after a minute of sawing. Absent a rear hole for the auxiliary handle, I had to place both hands on the D-handle when sawing.

Before I could get the saw in my vise though I had to remove the D handle, which was riveted on using rivets that looked like slotted screw heads. Needed to drill those out, enlarge the holes, and replace with real saw screws. A little anvil time straightened the blade though care had to be taken with the soft thin steel so as not to overdo it. Once in the vise I began a lengthy jointing session to get the teeth down to raker level. This required taking the cutters down almost 1/8", and chewing up an old file on those hardened edges. Filing, setting and swaging was easy, as the steel was soft. The thin steel hammered easily, too easily. Light taps were all it took to move the metal. This was no Royal Chinook.

Now properly filed and with a rear hole added for the auxiliary handle, it was back to the test log. Set at 16/12, the saw cut much better now and a little pile of noodles collected beneath the log. The thin plate still had a flimsy feel though and I didn't saw hard with it fearing it would buckle. Overall, I would rate this saw below a Jemco, as at least the Jemco saw has a stout plate. Both saws need a lot of work and both can be made to cut, but why bother when there are so many quality old saws still available at auctions or antique stores.

P1030707.jpg


RIVETS!!
P1030719.JPG


Rakers this low? Really?
P1030700.jpg


After some file time
P1030746.JPG
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Gavin Longrain » December 10th, 2016, 11:02 am

Please name the brand. I guess it is Wilpu a.k.a Wilhelm Putsch.
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby PATCsawyer » December 10th, 2016, 12:29 pm

Brand wasn't listed, only that it was "Made in Germany".
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Sawman » December 10th, 2016, 12:40 pm

Went through the same process last march at the Bodgers Ball near Bristol. Peter and one other student brought in there new Sheffield made Thomas Flinn 3 foot d handle G.A. pattern and asked my advise on it to get them to work as they were having problems with them. Gavin and others had told me that they are rubbish, but I was keeping an open mind on it. So a nice bright shiny saw was produced. Picked it up and first impression good handle but very light, moved to the saw horse with the saw and the blade kept going when the handle stopped. So this was a very very flexible saw mmm. Started to saw complete rubbish, didn't cut and in fear that the blade would simple bend and kink. Didn't look at the set as I had made up my mind that this was a very poor saw and just wasn't worth the time to go through the process to attempt to make it half decent. We managed to get hold of 2 good saws a Spear and Jackson (pre 1900) and a later Tazack both taper ground and not to rusty. Both students were over the moon at last they had a saws that would cut wood with ease and speed and only for £10 per saw. So I concur with Dan stick with the old stuff no matter how bad as the new (at the moment) is complete rubbish.
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Treeline » December 10th, 2016, 3:06 pm

Looks like a "Traditional Woodworker" saw. I tuned one of those for a guy on the Bushcraft site and did a nice comprehensive review of it with pics, but the moderators deleted it because I wouldn't buy a vendor membership. sheesh. anyway, I thought I posted it here in the database too, but don't see it. I know I still have pics and will see if I can add it.

I found the same things as you, very poor quality, basically sheet metal stamped into the shape of a saw. pretty sad they can sell these!
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Jim_Thode » December 10th, 2016, 3:48 pm

Treeline wrote:Looks like a "Traditional Woodworker" saw. I tuned one of those for a guy on the Bushcraft site and did a nice comprehensive review of it with pics, but the moderators deleted it because I wouldn't buy a vendor membership. sheesh. anyway, I thought I posted it here in the database too, but don't see it. I know I still have pics and will see if I can add it.

I found the same things as you, very poor quality, basically sheet metal stamped into the shape of a saw. pretty sad they can sell these!


Here is a past post on a Traditional Woodworker saw
http://www.crosscutsawyer.com/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=853
This one looks quite a bit thicker.
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Treeline » December 10th, 2016, 5:26 pm

You're right, Jim. Those Star brand saws are thicker, but are not what Traditional woodworker is currently selling. the newer saws are truly terrible.
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Treeline » December 11th, 2016, 5:35 am

Here we go, I found the pics.

Traditional Woodworker saw

Image

Image

Older Jemco on the bottom, TW on the top, notice how thin

Image

Here's a good comparison. TW on top, Jemco in the middle, Royal Chinook on the bottom

Image
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Gavin Longrain » December 11th, 2016, 6:26 am

How thick are each these saws?
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Re: German tuttle-tooth saw

Postby Jim_Thode » December 11th, 2016, 9:05 am

Good comparison on the thickness. At 18 gauge the TW would be about 0.048" and the Royal Chinook should be about 0.103". You could glue two of the TW's together and still not be as thick as a RC.
In my mine that would put the TW in the category of a SSO (Saw Shaped Object). Not really a saw but just shaped like a saw.

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