My first try at MIG welding

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My first try at MIG welding

Postby PATCsawyer » September 3rd, 2016, 10:00 am

Many thanks to John Starling for his advice on these techniques. First try was the puddle forge method using a Forney 125 MIG welder. Pooled the weld incorporating high speed steel wire on a copper heat sink and hammered it a bit (probably not enough, but it worked). Ground it to shape with a Dremel tool (too afraid to try an angle grinder so close to the other teeth), filed and set. Saw was a Simonds 325 with a broken cutter near the center.

I covered the top but didn't think to consider the side splatter. Fortunately, I'd not done the final pointing and this wasn't an issue. Next time I'll use one of Jim Thode's potatoes.
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Cleaned up and ready for the final set and pointing.
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Re: My first try at MIG welding

Postby PATCsawyer » September 3rd, 2016, 10:41 am

Second try was a raker on a Simonds 503, an eBay treasure missing a middle raker. It's longish teeth suggested it had been taken out of service early in its life.

A closer look at the raker stump showed it was bent out, though a little anvil time fixed that. Then matched up a replacement raker from a scrap 503 in my shop. I wasn't sure the little Forney homeowner welder would do the job on that thick steel, but it worked just fine. I cut the replacement to sit a little higher just to insure that it would joint up properly. Took the bead down with a Dremel tool and finished with a sanding block. Ready to be jointed, filed, and set.

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Re: My first try at MIG welding

Postby dayle1960 » September 3rd, 2016, 1:25 pm

That is very nice work. I applaud you for your efforts. I noticed that there was some blueing and couldn't help but wonder if that added or took away some of the temper. Did you do anything to overcome that situation? Or did you just leave it alone?

Great job!!!!
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Re: My first try at MIG welding

Postby PATCsawyer » September 3rd, 2016, 2:48 pm

I re-tempered the teeth but not the raker, as I put heat sinks around the raker tips. Perhaps John could comment on any need to re-temper the raker.
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Re: My first try at MIG welding

Postby Starling_Saw » September 3rd, 2016, 5:50 pm

PATCsawyer wrote:I re-tempered the teeth but not the raker, as I put heat sinks around the raker tips. Perhaps John could comment on any need to re-temper the raker.

I would heat a gentle temper all the way to the tips. Not too hot or it will be too soft. Way to hot and it will be brittle. shoot for 550 to 600 degrees.
They look very good. You will get a little splatter with the flux core wire, so you have to protect the other teeth from the raspberries that stick to everything. That is one of the reasons I went to a gas shielded MIG. I've done the flux core for a long time as well.
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Re: My first try at MIG welding

Postby Jim_Thode » September 3rd, 2016, 9:46 pm

Looks good, the final teeth look to be very serviceable and infinitely better then what was there before (nothing). I agree with John, a MIG welder as opposed to flux-cored arc welder is a real advantage. It is cleaner, easier to weld, easier to build up material, slag free and essentially smoke free. I used a stick welder that is essentially the same as a flux-cored arc welder for nearly 50 years. I picked up a MIG welder a few years ago and find it to be worth every penny of the cost.

I like the idea of feeding high strength steel into the mild steel weld puddle. I've never seen anything that would indicate that hammering on the hot weld would make the steel harder or more dense. However hammering on the cold weld would harden the weld due to work hardening. Work hardened is the increase in hardness of a metal produced by cold working. It is common to hammer hot welds to control the shrinkage, especially in relativity thin plates where shrinkage of the weld could cause warping or internal stresses. I've hammered on hot welds to control shrinkage on crack repairs in the body of saws but for welding on saw teeth shrinkage should not be an issue.

Jim
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Re: My first try at MIG welding

Postby SalmonCreek » November 2nd, 2016, 7:42 pm

Nice work on the teeth. And good info. I just got a used Lincoln flux core welder, replacing a Harbor Freight one. The Harbor Freight did ok on saws, but have not tried the Lincoln on saws, but does a better job on other applications I have tried.

Mike
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