merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

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merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2013, 5:21 am

What is the merit in having horns on a 'D' handle?
The one on the right has 2 horns, the left & middle have one horn.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby sumnergeo » July 26th, 2013, 11:33 am

The horns keep your hand in place. Equally important is the size of the hole. Leather gloves for normal work but heavy gloves or mittens for winter work require a larger hole.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 26th, 2013, 1:39 pm

sumnergeo wrote:The horns keep your hand in place. Equally important is the size of the hole. Leather gloves for normal work but heavy gloves or mittens for winter work require a larger hole.

Have you a view about 2 horns or 1 ?
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby Jim_Thode » July 26th, 2013, 3:32 pm

I think the two horned handle is not good on a crosscut saw for two reasons. When the saw is used with a supplemental handle on the handle end of the saw the hand/arm comes in at an higher angle and the upper horn will be in the way. When cutting a log that is flat on the ground hand/arm comes in at an higher angle and the upper horn will be in the way.

As long a the saw is used as a normal hand saw and the saw is pretty much in line with the sawyers arm, the two horned handle would work okay. Try to go through the motion of cutting with a hand saw (two horned handle) as if a log is on the ground and you will see what I mean.

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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby PackStringSaw » July 28th, 2013, 4:17 am

Gavin, I agree with Jim that the second (or top) horn would be in the way on a larger crosscut saw, would interfere with the person on that end of the saw.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby sumnergeo » July 28th, 2013, 4:30 am

I have never seen an upper horn on a crosscut saw handle, only on hand, panel and back saws.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby Gavin Longrain » July 28th, 2013, 4:52 am

sumnergeo wrote:I have never seen an upper horn on a crosscut saw handle, only on hand, panel and back saws.

The maker of this saw is Flinn Garlick in Sheffield. They do make many hand, panel and back saws and I guess use the handles from those saws on this cross-cut model.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby goodfeller » July 30th, 2013, 1:13 pm

I've seen some crosscuts with twin-horned handles--have even bought a couple--but they may have been replacement handles. Still, I seem to remember some ads in old catalogs for some saws with twin-horned handles--may have been Bluegrass or the like. I will check. Jim is right about why they are problematic--and they tend to have smaller hand holes. I have on a couple of occasions cut the top horn off a twin-horned handle and sanded it down to look like a regular D-handle. Worked OK but they may not be as strong given the curve on the top edge.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby goodfeller » July 31st, 2013, 5:07 am

With a little more research, I discovered that Simonds marketed saws with twin-horned handles; the 1940 Janney, Semple and Hill catalog lists a Simonds 223 and a 221 with twin-horned handles, but horns are not as pronounced as on handsaws. Several hardware firms sold twin-horned replacement handles for crosscuts in the 1920s.
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Re: merit of different 'D' handle patterns?

Postby trolleypup » August 21st, 2013, 7:11 pm

goodfeller wrote:With a little more research, I discovered that Simonds marketed saws with twin-horned handles; the 1940 Janney, Semple and Hill catalog lists a Simonds 223 and a 221 with twin-horned handles, but horns are not as pronounced as on handsaws. Several hardware firms sold twin-horned replacement handles for crosscuts in the 1920s.

I have a 223 with a double horn handle. When using the saw with and without a supplementary handle, the upper horn was not a problem, not interfering with holding the saw...however, it was also not an aid to sawing. I will note that the lower horn also neither helps or hinders.

I do have tuttle tooth pattern pruning saws that lack horns altogether...and especially on the ones with swaged rakers (Thanks Dolly!), I actually hold them low enough that my pinkie finger is outside the loop of the handle...in that case, a lower horn would interfere.
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